DIAMOND RAIDERS

BOB CURBY

Author, Editor & Publisher

DETAILS OF "DIAMOND RAIDERS"

25 years after the murder of her father and the subjection of her mother to multiple rapes by jackbooted security guards of Swakopmund Mining Corporation, Analise Van Rensberg returns to Namibia to seek her revenge. She recruits four specialists, Kurt Hoeliche, expert in all things military, Tom Botha, expert in all things electronic, Margie Makabe, expert in all things to do with diamonds, and Rafi Henderson-Villiers, expert in all things marine. With them she plans to pull off the heist of the century by stealing multi-million dollars worth of uncut diamonds from the Namibian company. Others have died trying. The team attack the off-shore dredger of the Swakopmund Diamond Corporation in Namibia, empty it's coffers of several days' dredging of high quality uncut diamonds, and flee in a fast motor cruiser. Hot on their heels are the security guards of SMC, and then InterPol and Scotland Yard join the chase. The pursuit goes right down to the last line. Do they get caught? Well, you need to read the book.

DIAMOND RAIDERS - by Bob Curby...

Chapter 1

 

Namibia, September 26th, 1986, dawn, two miles north of the town of Swakopmund, in the 'Forbidden Zone'. The desert spreads out like a huge stony Martian landscape from the sea, out as far as the eye can see. A hostile landscape unfriendly in many ways, not only the heat and stinging sand but the diamond fields, the domain of the violently protective diamond mining companies. A silver thread of almost perfectly straight tarmac, the one and only road through the region, the C34, was just visible in the tawny brown of the stony desert landscape.

Along that ribbon, Rick Van Rensberg, was unfolding his sunglasses in preparation for the glaring sun about to pop up over the horizon to his right. His gunmetal grey Mercedes SL600 was whispering along the road at an easy 60 miles per hour. Alongside him was Marie his Russian wife, still dozing from the night drive up from the South African border, and in the back, sound asleep was a small girl, just 5 years old. It had been a long journey and the first time they had ventured out of Cape Town. How green and lush that seemed in comparison to this unfriendly landscape.

The family were travelling all the way up to visit Rick's brother in the north of Namibia, up near the Okavango, and he had wanted to get a good way up before the sun got too hot. Just beyond his vision, over the dunes ahead, was one of the largest storage facilities of uncut diamonds in the world, Swakopmund Mining Corporation known locally as SMC, constantly monitoring the area for would-be thieves, manifesting its presence by lookout towers, and hovering security helicopters.

SMC chose this spot because the Namib Desert provided no cover for anyone approaching from the land and approach by sea was almost impossible without early detection, not to mention the extreme shallowness of the water extending out over three kilometres. Diamonds lay on the desert sand, sparkling in the sunlight and on the seabed in gravel layers under the oyster shells. SMC had staked a claim alongside the original South West African Mining operation with its even bigger facility and veritable army to protect it. Although much smaller SMC held its own when it came to security and although not having an army, trained fully equipped guards, a force to be reckoned with, protected their underground storage facility.

SMC was very efficient in preventing the theft of even one diamond from their area. Rick's Mercedes passed one of many signs that carry the message 'WARNING! DO NOT STOP ON THIS ROAD. IN THE EVENT OF BREAKDOWN, DO NOT GET OUT OF YOUR VEHICLE. ASSISTANCE WILL BE PROVIDED.' The South African Automobile Association had advised Rick that this area was restricted, a 'forbidden zone' and that he was not to stop and certainly not to get out. If he was to break down, he was to remain in the car with sidelights on and SMC or one of the other mining companies would send out a rescue party. He had snorted at that warning, he did not really believe that they had the authority nor would they do anything if he stopped.

He failed to notice the blackened patches alongside the road with odd pieces of metal protruding.......

 

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